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dc.contributor.advisorDoane, Mollyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMichels, John F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:41:06Z
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:41:06Z
dc.date.created2013-08en_US
dc.date.issued2013-10-22
dc.date.submitted2013-08en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/10107
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the gentrification of space in the Almaguin Highlands in rural Ontario, Canada. Although the Almaguin Highlands has long been home to small vacation cabins and cottages, it has recently begun to attract wealthy urban weekenders who build summer homes on a grander scale. As former farms and logging operations are transformed into newly accessible recreational, vacation, and residential destinations, both tensions and alliances arise between new residents, long-term residents, tourists, loggers, farmers, developers, and governmental officials over proper uses and meanings of rural space. My research examines the ways in which these different groups of people regard these changes and demonstrates how their views vary according to class or occupational position, but not always in predictable ways. In this dissertation I pursue the following four theoretical claims: First, rather than interpreting former farming and forestry sectors of the 21st century North American countryside as post-productive, they must be understood as spaces that encompass new kinds of production, including recreational, touristic, and residential development. The implications of this new service-oriented countryside include increased youth outmigration, decreasing full-time employment opportunities, and an ever-increasing gap between the rich and the poor in rural areas. Second, part of what drives rural gentrification in 21st century North America is a middle- and upper-class romanticized interpretation of nature. The result has been an increase in urban middle- and upper-class residents spending leisure time, or moving permanently, to the countryside. Third, rural gentrification, rather than mirroring urban lifestyle preferences, is a reflection of the class transformation of space related to cycles of capitalist investment. Many of the same processes involved in the gentrification of urban space apply to rural space and vice versa. Finally, neoliberalism, although often described as deregulatory, must also be understood as a re-regulatory process. Oftentimes, these new regulations work in the interests of large corporations and the elite.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectRural gentrificationen_US
dc.subjectgentrificationen_US
dc.subjecteconomic developmenten_US
dc.subjectrural developmenten_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectNorth Americaen_US
dc.subjectneoliberalismen_US
dc.subjectcottagingen_US
dc.subjectagricultureen_US
dc.subjectforestryen_US
dc.subjecttourismen_US
dc.subjectnature and environmenten_US
dc.subjectyouth outmigrationen_US
dc.titleWhere Do We Go From Here? Rural Development and Gentrification in the Almaguin Highlands, Ontarioen_US
thesis.degree.departmentAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Illinois at Chicagoen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePhD, Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLiechty, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMonaghan, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPatil, Crystalen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBarrett, Stanleyen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US


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