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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Angela J.
dc.contributor.authorTheodore-Oklota, Christina
dc.contributor.authorHadley, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Larry K.
dc.contributor.authorDonenberg, Geri
dc.contributor.authorDiClemente, Ralph
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-03T20:46:28Z
dc.date.available2013-12-03T20:46:28Z
dc.date.issued2012-11
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationStewart, A. J. Theodore-Oklota, C. Hadley, W. Brown, L. K. Donenberg, G. DiClemente, R. Project, Style Study Grp. "Mania Symptoms and HIV-Risk Behavior Among Adolescents in Mental Health Treatment." Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology 41(6): 803-810. DOI: 10.1080/15374416.2012.675569en_US
dc.identifier.issn1537-4416
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/10745
dc.descriptionPost print version of article may differ from published version. This is an electronic version of an article published in; Stewart, A. J. Theodore-Oklota, C. Hadley, W. Brown, L. K. Donenberg, G. DiClemente, R. Project, Style Study Grp "Mania Symptoms and HIV-Risk Behavior Among Adolescents in Mental Health Treatment." Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology 41(6): 803-810.. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ DOI: 10.1080/15374416.2012.675569en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study explored whether adolescents with elevated symptoms of mania (ESM+) engage in more HIV risk behaviors than those with other psychiatric disorders and examined factors associated with HIV risk behavior among ESM+ adolescents. Method: Eight hundred and forty adolescents (56% female, 58% African American, mean age 14.9 years) who received mental health treatment completed private, computer-based assessments of psychiatric disorders, sexual and substance use behaviors, and provided urine to screen for sexually transmitted infections (STI). Results: Eighty-seven percent met criteria for a psychiatric disorder and among these youth 21% were considered ESM+. Compared to those with other psychiatric disorders, ESM+ were more likely to be sexually active (61.6% vs. 53.6%), have multiple sexual partners (58.6% vs. 37.5%), have unprotected sex (38.4% vs. 28.0%), exchange sex for money (4.7% vs. 1.2%) and to test positive for an STI (14.0% vs. 6.3%). Among ESM+ youth, sexual risk behaviors were primarily associated with individual factors (e.g., self-efficacy, impulsivity, and substance use) and varied depending on the type of sexual behavior (e.g., onset of sex, number of partners, and condom use). Conclusions: Adolescents with ESM should be regularly screened for sexual risk behaviors and receive HIV prevention skills. Efforts to increase self-efficacy for safer sex, reduce impulsivity, and decrease substance use may be effective targets for sexual risk reduction among adolescents with ESM.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health (R01 MH63008) to Rhode Island Hospital (P.I. Larry K. Brown, M.D.) and the Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.subjectBipolar Disorderen_US
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_US
dc.subjectManiaen_US
dc.titleMania Symptoms and HIV-Risk Behavior Among Adolescents in Mental Health Treatmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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