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dc.contributor.authorNelson, Brady D.
dc.contributor.authorMcGowan, Sarah Kate
dc.contributor.authorSarapas, Casey
dc.contributor.authorRobison-Andrew, E. Jenna
dc.contributor.authorAltman, Sarah E.
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Miranda L.
dc.contributor.authorGorka, Stephanie M.
dc.contributor.authorKatz, Andrea C.
dc.contributor.authorShankman, Stewart A.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-02T20:37:24Z
dc.date.available2014-01-02T20:37:24Z
dc.date.issued2013-08
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNelson, B. D., McGowan, S. K., Sarapas, C., Robison-Andrew, E. J., Altman, S. E., Campbell, M. L., Gorka, S. M., Katz, A. C. and Shankman, S. A. Biomarkers of Threat and Reward Sensitivity Demonstrate Unique Associations With Risk for Psychopathology. Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 2013. 122(3): 662-671. DOI: 10.1037/a0033982en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-843X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/10966
dc.description© 2013 American Psychological Association. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. The original publication is available at www.apa.org; DOI: 10.1037/a0033982en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo emotional/motivational constructs that have been posited to underlie anxiety and depressive disorders are heightened sensitivity to threat and reduced sensitivity to reward, respectively. It is unclear, though, whether these constructs are only epiphenomena or also connote risk for these disorders (and relatedly, whether they connote risk for separate disorders). Using family history of psychopathology as an indicator of risk, the present study examined whether biomarkers of sensitivity to threat (startle potentiation) and reward (frontal EEG asymmetry) were associated with similar or different familial liabilities. In addition, the present study examined whether these biomarkers were associated with risk independent of proband DSM-IV diagnosis. One hundred seventy-three individuals diagnosed with panic disorder (PD), early-onset major depressive disorder (MDD), both (comorbids), or controls completed two laboratory paradigms assessing sensitivity to predictable/unpredictable threat (measured via startle response) and reward (measured via frontal EEG asymmetry during a gambling task). Results indicated that across all participants: 1) startle potentiation to unpredictable threat was associated with family history of PD (but not MDD) and 2) frontal EEG asymmetry while anticipating reward was associated with family history of MDD (but not PD). Additionally, both measures continued to be associated with family history of psychopathology after controlling for proband DSM-IV diagnosis. Results suggest that the proposed biomarkers of sensitivity to unpredictable threat and reward exhibit discriminant validity and may add to the predictive validity of the DSM-IV defined constructs of PD and MDD, respectively.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by NIMH Grant R21MH080689 (awarded to S.A.S.) and the NIH Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, UL1TR000050 (awarded to UIC).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.subjectanxietyen_US
dc.subjectdepressionen_US
dc.subjectbiomarkersen_US
dc.subjectelectroencephalographyen_US
dc.titleBiomarkers of Threat and Reward Sensitivity Demonstrate Unique Associations with Risk for Psychopathologyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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