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dc.contributor.authorTaber, Daniel R.
dc.contributor.authorChriqui, Jamie F.
dc.contributor.authorPerna, Frank M.
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Lisa M.
dc.contributor.authorSlater, Sandy J.
dc.contributor.authorChaloupka, Frank J.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-03T17:22:30Z
dc.date.available2014-01-03T17:22:30Z
dc.date.issued2013-11
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationTaber DR, Chriqui JF, Perna FM, Powell LM, Slater SJ, Chaloupka FJ. Association between state physical education (PE) requirements and PE participation, physical activity, and body mass index change. Preventive Medicine. 2013 Nov;57(5):629-33. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.08.018.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1096-0260
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/10990
dc.descriptionNOTICE: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Preventive Medicine. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Preventive Medicine, Vol 57, Issue 5, 2013 DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.08.018en_US
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To determine if state physical education (PE) laws are associated with student physical education attendance and physical activity (PA), and whether physical education and competitive food laws, in conjunction, are associated with lower BMI change. METHOD: State laws regarding physical education time requirements and competitive foods in 2003 and 2006 were classified as strong, weak, or none, based on codified law ratings obtained from the Classification of Laws Associated with School Students. Laws were linked to student data on PE attendance and physical activity (8th grade, Spring 2007) and BMI change (5th-8th grade, 2004-2007), obtained from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (n=5510 students in 40 states). RESULTS: Girls reported 0.31 more days of activity (95% CI: 0.02, 0.61) and were more likely to attend physical education ≥3days/week (74.1% versus 52.1%, difference=22.0, 95% CI: 2.1, 42.0) if they resided in states with strong physical education laws compared to no physical education laws. Weak physical education laws had modest associations with PE and activity, and there was no evidence that weak laws reduce BMI gain regardless of competitive food laws. CONCLUSION: Strong physical education laws with specific time requirements may increase physical education attendance and activity in girls. There is insufficient evidence that physical education laws reduce student weight gain.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSupport for this study was provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to the Bridging the Gap Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago (PI: Frank Chaloupka) and contracts HHSN261201000350P and HHSN261201100522P from the National Cancer Institute to the University of Illinois at Chicago (PI: Jamie Chriqui).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.titleAssociation between state physical education (PE) requirements and PE participation, physical activity, and body mass index changeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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