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dc.contributor.authorKaushal, N
dc.contributor.authorKaestner, RJ
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-12T17:48:11Z
dc.date.available2017-02-13T10:30:07Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-01
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationKaushal, N. and Kaestner, R. J. Are foreign-trained nurses perfect substitutes for U.S.-Trained nurses? Industrial and Labor Relations Review. 2015. 68(5): 1102-1125. DOI: 10.1177/0019793915592624.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0019-7939
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/20142
dc.descriptionThis is the copy of an article published in Industrial and Labor Relations Review © 2015 Industrial and Labor Relations Review.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe authors investigate whether foreign- and U.S.-trained nurses are substitutes by studying the differences in their wages and whether wage differentials respond to relative supplies of foreign- and U.S.- trained nurses. Regression estimates suggest that foreign-trained nurses without a bachelor’s degree enjoy a wage premium of 1 to 3% over similar U.S.-trained nurses after adjusting for demographic, workplace, work type, and geographic differences, but no wage difference exists among those with a bachelor’s degree. For all nurses combined, the wage difference is modest and statistically insignificant. This result suggests that foreign- and U.S.-trained nurses are equally productive and close substitutes. The authors also test explicitly for whether foreign- and U.S.-trained nurses are substitutes and cannot reject the hypothesis that they are.en_US
dc.publisherIndustrial and Labor Relations Reviewen_US
dc.subjectimmigrationen_US
dc.subjectnursesen_US
dc.subjectearningsen_US
dc.titleAre Foreign-trained Nurses Perfect Substitutes for U.S.-trained Nurses?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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