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dc.contributor.advisorDorevitch, Samuelen_US
dc.contributor.authorMatzke, Hannahen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-19T15:09:28Z
dc.date.available2016-10-19T15:09:28Z
dc.date.created2016-08en_US
dc.date.issued2016-10-19
dc.date.submitted2016-08en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/21337
dc.description.abstractThe first case of human West Nile Virus (WNV) in Illinois was reported in 2002, and infections have been reported in Illinois every year since. Many human infections are asymptomatic, but some exhibit flu-like symptoms, and the most severe infections become neuroinvasive and can be fatal. The transmission cycle is maintained between Culex mosquitoes and passerine birds, humans and horses are incidental hosts. Both birds and mosquitoes have preferred habitats and regional species variations; life cycle and behavioral patterns can be influenced by weather. Urban environments allow for close proximity of humans and mosquitoes, and may create microenvironments that are suitable habitats for mosquito populations to flourish. The aim of this study is to understand the associations of human neuroinvasive WNV infections and urbanization, weather, and land cover in Illinois using a multivariate model. These relationships are important to understand to assess the impact of climate change on future WNV transmission.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2016 Hannah Matzkeen_US
dc.subjectWest Nile Virusen_US
dc.subjectNeuroinvasive West Nile Virusen_US
dc.subjectTemperatureen_US
dc.subjectPrecipitationen_US
dc.subjectLand Coveren_US
dc.subjectDeveloped Landen_US
dc.subjectWeatheren_US
dc.subjectClimateen_US
dc.subjectClimate Changeen_US
dc.subjectBRACE Illinoisen_US
dc.subjectCulexen_US
dc.titleUrbanization, Land Cover, Weather, and Incidence Rates of Neuroinvasive West Nile Virus Infectionen_US
thesis.degree.departmentSchool of Public Healthen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePublic Health Sciences-Environmental and Occupational Healthen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Illinois at Chicagoen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMS, Master of Scienceen_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDworkin, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFriedman, Leeen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US


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