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dc.contributor.authorBokhour, Barbara G.
dc.contributor.authorFix, Gemmae M.
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Howard S.
dc.contributor.authorLong, Judith A.
dc.contributor.authorDeLaughter, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorOrner, Michelle B.
dc.contributor.authorPope, Charlene
dc.contributor.authorHouston, Thomas K.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-17T21:41:48Z
dc.date.available2017-10-18T09:30:10Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-01
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBokhour, B. G., Fix, G. M., Gordon, H. S., Long, J. A., DeLaughter, K., Orner, M. B., Pope, C. and Houston, T. K. Can stories influence African-American patients' intentions to change hypertension management behaviors? A randomized control trial. Patient Education and Counseling. 2016. 99(9): 1482-1488. DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2016.06.024.en_US
dc.identifier.issn07383991
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/21462
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. or its licensors or contributors. ScienceDirect ® is a registered trademark of Elsevier B.V.Post print version of article may differ from published version. The definitive version is available through Elsevier Ireland Ltd at DOI:10.1016/j.pec.2016.06.024en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives Information-only interventions for hypertension management have limited effectiveness, particularly among disadvantaged populations. We assessed the impact of viewing African-American patients’ stories of successfully controlling hypertension on intention to change hypertension management behaviors and engagement with educational materials. Methods In a three-site randomized trial, 618 African-American Veterans with uncontrolled hypertension viewed an information-only DVD about hypertension (control) or a DVD adding videos of African-American Veterans telling stories about successful hypertension management (intervention). After viewing, patients were asked about their engagement with the DVD, and their intentions to change behavior. Mean scores were compared with two-sided t-tests. Results Results favored the Stories intervention, with significantly higher emotional engagement versus control (4.3 vs. 2.2 p < 0.0001). Intervention patients reported significantly greater intentions to become more physically active (4.6 vs. 4.4, p = 0.018), use salt substitutes (3.9 vs. 3.4, p = 0.006), talk openly with their doctor about hypertension (4.6 vs. 4.5, p = 0.049), and remember to take hypertension medication (4.8 vs. 4.6, p = 0.04). Conclusion Patients were more emotionally engaged and reported intentions to change behavior when watching real patient hypertension management success stories. Practice implications Stories may be more influential than information alone, and represent a scalable approach to modifying behavioral intention.en_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltden_US
dc.subjectTeacher learningen_US
dc.subjectTeacher educationen_US
dc.subjectInclusive educationen_US
dc.subjectSchool/university partnershipsen_US
dc.titleCan stories influence African-American patients’ intentions to change hypertension management behaviors? A randomized control trial.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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