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dc.contributor.advisorSimpson, Dicken_US
dc.contributor.authorMouritsen, Melissa Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-27T23:36:51Z
dc.date.available2017-10-27T23:36:51Z
dc.date.created2017-05en_US
dc.date.issued2017-01-10en_US
dc.date.submittedMay 2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/21833
dc.description.abstractPolicy making in suburban governments has not been as robustly studied as that of larger cities. Explanations tend to rely on market and economic explanations, portraying suburban governments as pawns or even prisoners of the larger metropolitan economy. Sometimes suburbia is even described as a battleground for jobs, resources and residents. This leaves little to no room for politics in suburban governance; instead it is an all out quest for the maximization of tax revenues. Using Savitch and Kantor’s concept of driving and steering variables, I propose that suburban governments can and do have agency in the decisions they make. Suburbs create a vision of what they want for their community, and enact policy to realize that vision to the extent that they have the necessary resources to achieve that vision.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.subjectSuburbsen_US
dc.subjectvisionen_US
dc.subjectpolicyen_US
dc.subjectsuburban governanceen_US
dc.titleLooking Inside the Black Box: Economic Development in Suburbiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.departmentPolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Illinois at Chicagoen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePhD, Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJudd, Dennisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcKenzie, Evanen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberZhang, Yueen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHendrick, Rebeccaen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.contributor.chairSimpson, Dicken_US


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