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dc.contributor.authorAbril, Eulàlia, P.
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-23T20:46:40Z
dc.date.available2018-10-23T20:46:40Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-02
dc.identifier.issn0730-9384
dc.identifier.other10.1017/pls.2017.11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/22793
dc.descriptionCopyright @ Association for Politics and the Life Sciencesen_US
dc.description.abstractResearchers have sought to understand the effects of likeminded versus contrary news exposure on attitude polarization, which can be a threat to democracy. Yet, the online news environment offers opportunities for exposure to both types of news, albeit unequally. This study tests the effects of exposure to heterogeneous partisan news bundles (both likeminded and contrary news) on attitude polarization. Because media exposure can lead to bias, attitude polarization is tested as a direct and indirect effect via hostile media perceptions. Data in this study are from a between-subjects experimental design about the issue of assisted suicide. Results indicate that, even though the effect of the partisan news bundle on hostile media perceptions is significant, both direct and indirect effects on attitude polarization are null.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Politics and the Life Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectassisted suicideen_US
dc.subjectPartisan newsen_US
dc.subjecthostile media perceptionsen_US
dc.subjectonline newsen_US
dc.titleSubduing Attitude Polarization? How Partisan News May Not Affect Attitude Polarization for Online Publicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationAbril, E. P. (2018). Subduing attitude polarization? Politics and the Life Sciences, 37(1), 68-77. doi:10.1017/pls.2017.11en_US


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