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dc.contributor.authorBliwise, Donald L.
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Lauren E.
dc.contributor.authorMoreira, Daniel M.
dc.contributor.authorAndriole, Gerald L.
dc.contributor.authorHopp, Martin L.
dc.contributor.authorFreedland, Stephen J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-09T22:48:16Z
dc.date.available2019-04-09T22:48:16Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-13
dc.identifier.issn1365-7852
dc.identifier.other10.1038/s41391-018-0090-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/23388
dc.descriptionPost print version of article may differ from published version. The final publication is available at springerlink.com; DOI: 10.1038/s41391-018-0090-5en_US
dc.description.abstractImportance: Nocturia (voids arising from sleep) is a ubiquitous phenomenon reflecting many diverse conditions, but whether it has significance in its own right remains uncertain. Objective: To determine whether nocturia is an independent risk factor for mortality Design: Observational study Setting: Global study with most sites in North America and Europe Participants: 7,343 men, ages 50-75 at Baseline from the REDUCE (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events) trial Exposures: Nocturia Main Outcome and Measures: Cox proportional hazards models were used to test the association between nocturia (voiding 3 more times per night) and all-cause mortality. Potential confounding variables included: age, race, region of origin, treatment group, self-reported coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and peripheral vascular disease, smoking, alcohol use, prostate volume, and diuretics. Self-reported sleep quality, as measured with the Medical Outcomes Study sleep scale, was entered as a final step in the model. Results: Nocturia was associated with increased risk for mortality (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 1.72; 95% CI 1.15-2.55) independent from all demographics and medical comorbidities. Inclusion of disturbed sleep in the model reduced the magnitude of the association (HR = 1.43; 95% CI 0.93-2.19). Conclusions and Relevance: The interruption of sleep by nocturia may have long-term impact on health and may warrant targeted intervention.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Nature [academic journals on nature.com]en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.titleNocturia and associated mortality: observational data from the REDUCE trialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationBliwise, D. L., Howard, L. E., Moreira, D. M., Andriole, G. L., Hopp, M. L., & Freedland, S. J. (2019). Nocturia and associated mortality: observational data from the REDUCE trial. Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, 22(1), 77-83. doi:10.1038/s41391-018-0090-5en_US


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