Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorStovall, David
dc.creatorReynolds, Aja
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-05T15:57:38Z
dc.date.available2019-08-05T15:57:38Z
dc.date.created2019-05
dc.date.issued2019-05-14
dc.date.submittedMay 2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/23670
dc.description.abstractMy dissertation examines the intimate relationship between racialized state violence, gender-based violence, and Black girlhood. By studying a national nonprofit based in Chicago that runs an art and activism leadership program for African American girls, my research examines how working-class black girls use their voices, bodies, and stories to navigate and contest the socio-economic and political structures that lead to their and their families’ disposability and displacement. In turn, building on the work of Saidiya Hartman, Fred Moten, and Stefano Harney, I identify those contested sites as “fugitive spaces” in which black girls put forth nuanced self-narratives that unpack the multi-layered operations that render them invisible to themselves, their communities, and the various apparati of the state. Additionally, it provides a framework for a pedagogy of care as we engage with Black girls from a place of solidarity.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectblack girlhood
dc.subjecturban geographies
dc.subjectneoliberal- carceral state
dc.titleAin't Nobody Checkin' For Us': Race, Fugitivity and the Urban Geographies of Black Girlhood
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Policy Studies
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Illinois at Chicago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.namePhD, Doctor of Philosophy
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLipman, Pauline
dc.contributor.committeeMemberNguyen, Nicole
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFerguson, Roderick
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBrown, Ruth
dc.type.materialtext
dc.contributor.chairStovall, David


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record