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dc.contributor.authorWiberley, Stephen E., Jr
dc.contributor.authorHurd, Julie M.
dc.contributor.authorWeller, Ann C.
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-11T14:18:36Z
dc.date.available2009-12-11T14:18:36Z
dc.date.issued2006-05
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationStephen E. Wiberley, Jr., Julie M. Hurd, Ann C. Weller, “Publication Patterns of U.S. Academic Librarians from 1998 to 2002,” College & Research Libraries 67 (May 2006): 205-216.en
dc.identifier.issn0010-0870
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/6905
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the contributions of U.S. academic librarians to the peer-reviewed literature of library and information science (LIS). Compared to the authors’ study of 32 journals for 1993-1997, the present study finds that for 1998-2002, there were declines in the total number of refereed articles (almost 4%), number of refereed articles by academic librarians (almost 13%), proportion of refereed articles by academic librarians (just over 4%), proportion of academic librarian authors (almost 3%), and proportion of co-authored articles by academic librarians (almost 4%). Because different factors influence rates of authorship in a given set of journals and these rates tend to fluctuate in the short term, only further investigation can assess whether the declines are momentary or the start of a trend. Approximately 7% of academic librarians wrote 3 or more articles. The 20 most productive libraries published more than 10% of all refereed articles in the 32 journals and nearly one-third of the articles by academic librarians.en
dc.publisherAssociation of College and Research Librariesen
dc.subjectjournal article publicationsen
dc.subjectacademic librariansen
dc.titlePublication patterns of U.S. academic librarians from 1998 to 2002en
dc.typeArticleen


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