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dc.contributor.authorNajdowski, Cynthia J.
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-27T18:34:41Z
dc.date.available2012-05-27T18:34:41Z
dc.date.issued2011-11
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNajdowski, C. J. 2011. Stereotype Threat in Criminal Interrogations: Why Innocent Black Suspects Are at Risk for Confessing Falsely. Psychology Public Policy and Law, 17(4): 562-591. DOI: 10.1037/a0023741en
dc.identifier.issn1076-8971
dc.identifier.otherDOI: 10.1037/a0023741
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/8336
dc.description© 2009 by American Psychological Association; Psychology, Public Policy, and Law. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. DOI: 10.1037/a0023741en
dc.description.abstractLittle theoretical attention has been paid to evidence that Blacks are overrepresented in samples of false confessors compared to Whites. One possible explanation is that innocent Black suspects experience stereotype threat in interrogations and that this threat causes Black suspects to experience more arousal, self-regulatory efforts, and cognitive load compared to White suspects. These psychological mechanisms could lead innocent Black suspects to display more nonverbal behaviors associated with deception and, ironically, increase the likelihood that police investigators perceive them as guilty. In response, investigators might engage in more coercive tactics and exert more pressure to confess on Black suspects than White suspects. This could increase the need to escape interrogation and the likelihood of doing so by confessing falsely more for Blacks than for Whites. I present these hypotheses within a social psychological framework, and discuss future directions for testing the model and theoretical and practical implications of such work.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen
dc.subjectstereotype threaten
dc.subjectraceen
dc.subjectdeception detectionen
dc.subjectinterrogationen
dc.subjectconfessionen
dc.titleStereotype Threat in Criminal Interrogations: Why Innocent Black Suspects are at Risk for Confessing Falselyen
dc.typeArticleen


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