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dc.contributor.authorHsieh, Chang-ming
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-25T04:53:33Z
dc.date.available2012-06-25T04:53:33Z
dc.date.issued2011-05
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationHsieh, C. 2011. Should We Give Up Domain Importance Weighting in QoL Measures? Social Indicators Research, 1-11. DOI: 10.1007/s11205-011-9868-8en
dc.identifier.issn0303-8300
dc.identifier.otherDOI: 10.1007/s11205-011-9868-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/8371
dc.descriptionPost print version of article may differ from published version. The original publication is available at springerlink.com; DOI: 10.1007/s11205-011-9868-8.en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this article is to examine the recent claims calling for abolishing domain importance weighting in quality of life (QoL) measures by considering the evidence conceptually and empirically. Based on a close review of evidence presented to date, it is suggested that using the range-of-affect hypothesis as a possible explanation of the poor performance of weighted satisfaction composite in predicting or correlating with global satisfaction or QoL measures can be beneficial to our understanding of the life satisfaction literature. However, given the conceptual focus and the empirical approach of the range-of-affect hypothesis presented in the life satisfaction context, using the range-of-affect hypothesis to argue against domain importance weighting raised more questions than answers. Calling for abolishing domain importance weighting in QoL measures, based on the evidence of range-of-affect hypothesis, is premature.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen
dc.titleShould We Give Up Domain Importance Weighting in QoL Measures?en
dc.typeArticleen


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