Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCameron, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-21T02:12:54Z
dc.date.available2012-08-21T02:12:54Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationCameron, R. 2010. Growing up and apart: Gender divergences in a Chicagoland elementary school. Language Variation and Change, 22(2): 279-319.DOI: 10.1017/S0954394510000074en
dc.identifier.issn0954-3945
dc.identifier.otherDOI: 10.1017/S0954394510000074
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/8591
dc.description© 2010 by Cambridge University Press, Language Variation and Change DOI: 10.1017/S0954394510000074en
dc.description.abstractA characteristic of children’s social orders is gender segregation. When children can choose, girls play more with girls and boys with boys. This begins around age three and peaks in later childhood. If children separate into same-gender groups, their interactions across the gender line will not be as frequent as those with members of the same sex. Following on Bloomfield’s assertion (1933:46) that “density of communication” results in the “most important differences of speech” within a community, I predict that differences will increasingly emerge between girls and boys. I test this using two sociolinguistic variables, (dh) and (ing), in the English spoken by children in an elementary school. The prediction is supported. Results contribute to research into language socialization and the acquisition of gendered linguistic expression.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.titleGrowing up and apart: Gender divergences in a Chicagoland elementary schoolen
dc.typeArticleen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record