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dc.contributor.advisorKassel, Jon D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHeinz, Adrienne J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-10T19:59:46Z
dc.date.available2014-06-11T09:30:24Z
dc.date.created2012-08en_US
dc.date.issued2012-12-10
dc.date.submitted2012-08en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/9324
dc.description.abstractConcurrent use of caffeine and alcohol is a rapidly growing phenomenon among young adults. Survey research indicates that caffeinated alcohol use is associated with a variety of health-risk behaviors although the mechanisms by which the combination may confer increased risk over alcohol alone are not well understood. Burgeoning research from the laboratory demonstrates that although caffeine only mildly antagonizes the effects of alcohol, individuals nonetheless feel less impaired, and therefore may be more likely to drive and to continue to drink alcohol. These findings may be explained by both the pharmacological effects of caffeine and by individuals’ expectations for caffeine to counteract the untoward effects of alcohol. The current study examined whether select affective, cognitive and behavioral outcomes, hypothesized to contribute to risk behavior, were modified by caffeinated alcohol or the expectation of receiving caffeinated alcohol. A 2 (caffeine instruction: told yes, told no) by 2 (caffeine consumption: consumed, did not consume) mixed design was employed and 146 male and female social drinkers between the ages of 21 and 30 were randomly assigned to receive either: 1) alcohol, 2) alcohol and caffeine, 3) alcohol and placebo caffeine, 4) alcohol + told no caffeine, get caffeine. Results suggest that the consumption of caffeinated alcohol may elevate risk for continued drinking, reduce sensitivity to intoxication and decrease reaction time without affecting accuracy. Conversely, consumption as well as the expectation of consuming caffeinated alcohol may reduce inattention, protect against some aspects of alcohol-related performance decrements and better preserve judgments of performance and agency. Together these findings indicate that caffeine, when combined with alcohol, has both beneficial and detrimental effects on mechanisms thought to contribute to risky behavior.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2012 Adrienne J. Heinzen_US
dc.subjectalcoholen_US
dc.subjectcaffeineen_US
dc.subjectimpulsivityen_US
dc.subjectrisk-takingen_US
dc.subjectjudgmenten_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Alcohol, Caffeine and Expectancies on Personal Agency, Impulsivity and Risk Takingen_US
thesis.degree.departmentPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Illinois at Chicagoen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePhD, Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMermelstein, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGonzalez, Raulen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberde Wit, Harrieten_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCorte, Colleenen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US


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