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dc.contributor.advisorNorr, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMisner, Susan J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-21T21:15:21Z
dc.date.available2013-02-21T21:15:21Z
dc.date.created2012-12en_US
dc.date.issued2013-02-21
dc.date.submitted2012-12en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/9746
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This research examined low-income, urban mothers’ social support environments as predictors of depressive symptoms from late pregnancy through six months postpartum. Background: The lack of a supportive social environment has been shown to increase risk for women’s depressive symptoms during pregnancy and postpartum, with serious potential outcomes for women and their children. The mechanisms of effect for social support remain unclear, though a buffering (moderating) effect has been theorized. Methods: A longitudinal design was used for secondary analysis of data for 279 low-income women of Mexican American or African American ethnicity. Data had been collected for a previous, randomized trial of a home-visit intervention program. The theoretical model incorporated social environmental factors and guided hierarchical linear multiple regression analyses to predict depressive symptoms. Results: In this sample, 33% at pregnancy, and 21% at 2 and 6 months postpartum reported severe symptoms. The final predictive model showed that depression at pregnancy and at 2 months postpartum, and perceived social support were strong predictors of depressive symptoms at 6 months postpartum. Social integration at pregnancy, network size, stability of support from the father of the baby, and difficult life circumstances also were significant predictors of symptoms at 6 months. Demographic factors were not predictive. The final model predicted 56% of the variance in women’s symptoms. The buffering effects of social support for the effects of life difficulties were not significant at any time point. Conclusions: A substantial proportion of low-income women had severe depressive symptoms during pregnancy compared to postpartum. Stable support from the father of the baby can be a protective factor. Perceived social support had a direct effect on women’s postpartum symptoms.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2012 Susan J. Misneren_US
dc.subjectpregnancyen_US
dc.subjectpostpartumen_US
dc.subjectdepressiveen_US
dc.subjectsocialen_US
dc.subjectsupporten_US
dc.subjectnetworken_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Social Environment Characteristics on Depressive Symptoms of Low-income Urban Mothersen_US
thesis.degree.departmentWomen, Child, and Family Health Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursing Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Illinois at Chicagoen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePhD, Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHughes, Tondaen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPark, Chang G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPopielarz, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWhite-Traut, Rosemaryen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US


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